Monthly Archives: September 2018

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Team travels to Nepal to start assessment of geohazard risk

Kathmandu, Nepal – July, 2018

The Government of Nepal has prioritized addressing the impacts of climate change and seismic hazards on transport infrastructure. The country is facing numerous challenges to manage geohazard risks to its road infrastructure, including challenging terrain, the unstable geology of the Himalayas, and the annual monsoon rainfall. To support the government to identify, assess and prioritize risk mitigation measures, the World Bank initiated the Geohazard Risk Management and Resilient Road Asset Management in Nepal project. The project will help improve the country’s road network resilience to seismic hazards and climate change.

In July, a team of specialists from ICEM and GEOCE went on a scoping and baseline assessment mission to Nepal under the Improving the Resilience of Nepal’s Strategic Roads Network project, implemented as component II of the larger World Bank initiative. This component looks to expand the current flood, landslide and seismic risk assessments in Nepal and contribute to government’s ongoing works in increasing the resilience of roads and bridges.

During the visit, the team met with senior level representatives from the Department of Roads (DOR), the Department of Local Infrastructure Development and Agricultural Roads (DOLIDAR) and the World Bank. The roundtable meeting was used as an opportunity to introduce the project, its methodology, and the main principles of the DOR’s approach to building resilient infrastructure. These principles must be taken into account when revising the project methodology, and kept in mind as the project progresses in order to ensure results are aligned with the DOR’s approach.

The meeting involved a plenary discussion of key technical issues of the project as identified by government counterparts, the […]

Modulators for training course on disaster risk reduction for urban planners in the ASEAN region

The ASEAN training course on disaster risk management for urban planning practitioners was developed by a team of international experts in urban planning and disaster risk management from ICEM, with input from ASEAN-based authorities. The technical experts that formed part of the project team that designed and wrote the course are:

  • Disaster risk management specialist, Kenneth Westgate: Ken’s long career in addressing and reducing disaster risk has included work with numerous international organisations across the globe. He has worked extensively in Africa and Asia, including in Uganda, Sudan, Tanzania, Kenya, Geneva, Egypt, the Balkan States, Cambodia and Timor Leste. Ken has served as Director at the Disaster Management Centre at Cranfield University in the UK and regional adviser for Africa in Disaster Risk Reduction for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Throughout his career, he has been involved in the training of disaster management specialist. His work at Cranfield culminated in the establishment of the first Masters Degree in Development and Disaster Management, among others. He is currently also supporting the Yemen Red Crescent Society in the development of their disaster management strategy.
  • Urban planner, Mike Sharrocks: Mike has over 35 years’ project experience in sustainable tourism strategies, urban planning and urban design work, sustainable land management, urban and rural regeneration strategies, infrastructure and land use development, master plans and development frameworks. He has worked on numerous projects worldwide in more than 30 countries, either as a team leader or as a team member, in North America, Europe, the Middle East, South and South East Asia, the Far East and the South Pacific, for various international organisations and funders.
  • Disaster and climate risk specialist, Ian Wilderspin: Ian has over 25 years of diverse experience in […]
By |September 17th, 2018|Uncategorized|2 Comments

Mission to Indonesia takes project team step closer to understanding climate change risk to critical infrastructure in region

Jakarta, Indonesia – July, 2018

To meet crucial development, inclusion and environmental goals in low-income countries and emerging markets, investment in large infrastructure is critical. The Asian Development Bank (ADB) estimated in 2017 that the developing Asia needed to invest around $26 trillion from 2016 to 2030 ($1.7 trillion annually) in transport, power, telecommunications and water and sanitation infrastructure to maintain current levels of growth. 

To increase knowledge on the risks of climate change to critical infrastructure in South and Southeast Asia, and to build a better understanding of the actions and innovations necessary to build critical infrastructure resilient to climate change, the ADB has commissioned TA 9191: Building Climate Change Resilience in Asia’s Critical Infrastructure. The project is being carried out by a joint venture between ICEM – International Centre for Environmental Management, the Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC), and Philkoei International. The project supports ADB’s effort to scale-up climate-resilient investments in its developing member countries (DMCs).

The project team recently undertook its first consultation mission to Indonesia, one of the project’s three pilot countries, to engage relevant Indonesian government agencies and to refine the scope of work in the country.

Transport infrastructure in Jakarta, Indonesia

The team met with various government agencies, institutes and organizations to secure their involvement, including the Ministry of National Development Planning (BAPPENAS), Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (MEMR), Ministry of Public Works and Housing (MPWH), Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG), Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MFF) and National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB).

While the project was introduced to […]