Adaptation news

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Valuable lessons captured in climate resilience films

Vietnam’s northern mountainous provinces are particularly vulnerable to intense storms which may become more frequent and intense due to the impact of climate change. The area is already prone to landslides and floods, but these could become more severe, damaging infrastructure and livelihoods and leaving the provinces with irreplaceable losses. To help the Vietnamese government and communities to protect rural infrastructure from the impacts of climate change, the GEF-funded project Promoting Climate Resilient Rural Infrastructure in Northern Vietnam was implemented in 2012.

ADB releases publication on green infrastructure

Rapid and unplanned urbanization leave cities and towns across the world vulnerable to environmental challenges, including the impact of extreme weather events such as floods and droughts and slow onset changes such as sea level rise. This impact is likely to become more severe due to climate change, threatening infrastructure and sustainability. Nature-based solutions, or green infrastructure, can play a significant role in building urban resilience to these challenges through the rehabilitation and expansion of natural ecosystems within built areas. It provides a foundation strategy to sustainable urban development.

Urban planners introduced to disaster risk screening tools

With natural hazards such as flooding, drought and storms set to increase, and urban populations and infrastructure to expand rapidly, urban planners must be able to assess disaster risk and threats associated with climate change in a holistic and integrated manner.

New GIS Climate Change Toolkit introduced

A toolkit that will enable Cambodian government staff to see what climatic changes are on the cards in areas where they are planning developments, is being created by ICEM. The toolkit will, among others, allow for projected climate change parameters to be incorporated in project design and management across all arms of government.ICEM introduced the GIS Climate Change Toolkit, which is still in development, this December at a one-day training workshop in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, attended by various government agencies and NGOs.

Download reports: New low-cost mechanism for investing in mangrove protection and restoration

Mangroves for the Future (MFF) and FAO have designed a new low-cost mechanism that enables investors to promote mangrove conservation and restoration through provision of funding to local communities.

Call for submissions – community-based climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction practices in Cambodia

The Department of Climate Change (DCC) of the General Secretariat of the National Council for Sustainable Development is requesting submissions of descriptions of credible climate change adaptation and disaster risk practices under two themes:

  1. Indigenous/traditional practices for climate change adaptation and DRR; and
  2. Practices that promote climate resilience and empowerment of women, children and youth.

The contribution will enhance and share knowledge on approaches to climate resilience appropriate to Cambodia. Practices then can be up-scaled to widely apply across Cambodia to reduce the impacts of climate change.

Up to 15 of the best documented practices will be shared at a national ‘Conference on Community Based Climate Change Response Practices in Cambodia’, to be held on 29-30 November 2016. They will also be published as part of a compendium of practices for distribution at national and international level.

The call is open to Cambodia-based non-government organizations (NGOs), community-based organizations (CBOs), university researchers, students, local communities and the private sector. Submissions can be either in Khmer or in English.

This forms part of the ADB project Mainstreaming Climate Resilience into Development Planning. It aims to strengthen Strategic Program for Climate Resilience (SPCR) coordination, technical support, and capacity of national and provincial policymakers, technical staff and civil society organizations to mainstream climate resilience into development planning. Two other outputs of the project include the development of a National Adaptation Plan (NAP) and detailed feasibility studies for selected National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) projects, and the development and dissemination of climate change adaptation knowledge products.

The deadline for submissions is 5pm (Cambodia time) on Wednesday, 2 November 2016.

For more information, please phone DCC at 012 617 092 and 077 535 392 or e-mail them at adbspcrta8179@gmail.com

For more imformatiom, refer to the full announcement […]

Workshop delivers crucial lessons on bioengineering

What have we learned about bioengineering and its potential to increase infrastructure resilience to the impacts of climate change? From the 4th to the 6th of October, ICEM - International Centre for Environmental Management, together with Asian Development Bank (ADB), Ministry of Agricultural and Rural Development (MARD) and United Nations Development Program (UNDP), hosted a workshop to review the results of four bioengineering demonstration sites, summarize the lessons learned, and discuss the way forward.

Seven towns set to integrate disaster risk management in planning

In order to gather necessary information to build a broad understanding of urban development challenges, in particular natural hazards and climate-related threats, ICEM technical specialists recently carried out a series of roundtable meetings and site visits in seven towns across three countries in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS).

ICEM Hosted Bioengineering Workshop: Design & Construction (Roads)

On the 13th and 14th of June, 2016, together with ADB and MARD, ICEM hosted the Bioengineering Workshop: Design & Construction (Roads) in Thai Nguyen. The workshop is the latest development of the ADB project Promoting Climate Resilience in Rural Infrastructure in Northern Vietnam.

Cambodia Climate Resilience Kicks Off With High-Level Roundtable Discussions

Cambodia Climate Resilience Kicks Off With High-Level Roundtable Discussions In February 2015 ICEM commenced work on a major new initiative to support of the Royal Cambodian Government (RGC) to strengthen resilience to climate change. The project entitled ‘Mainstreaming climate resilience into development planning’ is a four-year program funded by ADB under the global Climate Investment Funds initiative. The project aims to ensure that the RGC has sustained institutional and technical capacity to integrate adaptation concerns into development planning and is part of the RGC and ADB’s USD$555 million Strategic Program for Climate Resilience (SPCR).

Bioengineering Project in Bac Kan, Vietnam Sees Early Success

Bioengineering Project in Bac Kan, Vietnam Sees Early Success ICEM's first bioengineered slope project in Bac Kan Province is showing early signs of success. The test site is divided into four sections, with each section testing and showcasing a different green infrastructure technique. The sections showing the most growth thus far are sections 1 and 4, Brush Layering and Vetiver Grass.

Construction commences on Sub-Project 4 at the Cau River, Cho Moi District, Bac Kan, Vietnam

Construction has commenced on Sub-Project 4 at the Cau River, Cho Moi District, Bac Kan with a launching ceremony attended by CPMU, DARD, PPMU Bac Kan, Thanh Mai CPC, Cung Kieu Construction Company and ICEM. The project is part of the ICEM-implemented TA 8102-VIE: Promoting climate resilient rural infrastructure in Northern Vietnam.

Biochar Project Begins with Rapid Tour of GMS Countries

Biochar Project Begins with Rapid Tour of GMS Countries ICEM's Biochar team has kicked off the project with a tour of the region's six participating countries to perform the project's rapid fire assessment of biochar potential in the GMS.
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GMS Corridor towns enthusiastic about adapting to climate change

Government officials in towns along the Greater Mekong Sub-region East-West Economic Corridor have enthusiastically taken up the challenge of boosting their capacity to deal with climate change and formulate innovative adaptation solutions. Over the past few months, ICEM has been working with the towns of Kaysone Phomvihane (Lao PDR) and Dong Ha (Vietnam), to strengthen their capacity to manage climate change.

ICEM climate scientists forecast dramatic changes in crops, fisheries and livestock production in Mekong countries

BANGKOK, THAILAND  – 29 March 2013: A team of ICEM researchers today released the results from a study on climate change in the Lower Mekong Basin. A major finding in the study forecasts changes in temperature and rainfall altering the suitability for some important industrial and food crops in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Vietnam.

 

ICEM was contracted by The Mekong Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change Project (Mekong ARCC) – to conduct the study, the first of its kind in the Mekong region, for USAID’s Regional Development Mission for Asia (RDMA). The scientific team from ICEM looked at how changes in temperature and precipitation will affect growing conditions and yields for major crops like rice, maize, rubber, cassava, soya and coffee, as well as fisheries and livestock productivity. The study points to a number of “hotspots” around the region where climate change may have the strongest impact.

The region is highly dependent upon natural resources, with 70 percent of the basin’s 60 million people living as farmers and fishers, and highly vulnerable to changes in the climate and its impact on their livelihoods. The study represents the first step in the Mekong ARCC project’s effort to integrate science with local knowledge and help communities in the four countries prepare detailed local climate change adaptation assessments and plans for action. The study results will assist decision making and planning by government and business leaders in the four countries of the Lower Mekong Basin, which are exporters of crops like rubber, cassava and coffee.

Climate scientists generally agree that an average annual temperature increase of 2 degrees Celsius is a critical threshold—beyond this, climate change will severely disrupt natural systems and people’s lives. But according to the study, some areas […]

By |March 29th, 2013|Adaptation news, Climate change news, News|0 Comments

Climate change predictions in agriculture showcased at major conference

HANOI, VIETNAM – 7 March 2013: Climate change is set to impact extensively on agricultural productivity, and force changes in land usage by 2050 in lower Mekong Basin countries, according to a new ICEM study as part of the Mekong ARCC project.

The finding of the study in agriculture were presented in a large info-graphics poster at Mekong Environmental Symposium 2013 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Held 5-7 March  2013, the Mekong Environmental Symposium was an international platform for governmental decision-makers, scientists, and other organizations active in the Mekong context.

ICEM was present to contribute international expertise and to contribute to trans-disciplinary information exchange for the benefit of the river basin. Experts were present from all six riparian countries, in the fields of river ecology, environmental monitoring, hydrology, socio-economics, energy, disaster management, trade and other sectors. Approximately 300-350 participants attended the high-profile three-day event.

The findings of the study indicated that climate change will affect the lives and livelihoods of more than 42 million people in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB) who depend entirely on agriculture. Changes to the Mekong monsoon could cause floods, droughts and increasingly violent storms, bringing huge challenges to the agricultural sector.

The study (2011-2013) assessed the climate change impacts on subsistence and commercial farming in the LMB by 2050. Key subsistence and commercial crop species were studied, namely; lowland rain-fed rice, soya, maize, cassava, robusta coffee and rubber. The study used the results of statistical downscaling of Global Circulation Models coupled with a land use suitability assessment tool to examine the impacts of projected changes in climate on the suitability of the six crops.

Mekong riparian countries are facing severe human-induced challenges, due to socio-economic transformation, urbanization, and the ever increasing interlinking and economic growth […]

By |March 7th, 2013|Adaptation news, Climate change news, News|0 Comments