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ICEM Director General published in handbook of significant scholarly debates

ICEM Director General, Dr Jeremy Carew-Reid contributed a chapter on strategic environmental assessment of mainstream hydropower development in the Mekong to the recently published Routledge Handbook of the Environment in Southeast Asia.

ICEM’s Bioengineering, Healthy Rivers Feature in 2015 Mekong Forum on Water, Food, and Energy

Among other activities, ICEM hosted two working sessions at this year's Greater Mekong Forum on Water, Food, and Energy. Co-hosted by the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems, the Ministry of Environment of the Royal Cambodian Government, and the International Water Management Institute, the Forum is the largest event in the Mekong Region to address the confluence of water, food and energy.
By |October 28th, 2015|ICEM team, Mekong news, News|0 Comments

Construction commences on Sub-Project 4 at the Cau River, Cho Moi District, Bac Kan, Vietnam

Construction has commenced on Sub-Project 4 at the Cau River, Cho Moi District, Bac Kan with a launching ceremony attended by CPMU, DARD, PPMU Bac Kan, Thanh Mai CPC, Cung Kieu Construction Company and ICEM. The project is part of the ICEM-implemented TA 8102-VIE: Promoting climate resilient rural infrastructure in Northern Vietnam.

Biochar Project Begins with Rapid Tour of GMS Countries

Biochar Project Begins with Rapid Tour of GMS Countries ICEM's Biochar team has kicked off the project with a tour of the region's six participating countries to perform the project's rapid fire assessment of biochar potential in the GMS.

ICEM Brings Spatial Expertise to Mekong Delta Forum

ICEM Brings Spatial Expertise to Mekong Delta Forum The Mekong Delta Forum, co-hosted by MARD, MONRE, World Bank, Australian Aid, Kingdom of the Netherlands, was held in Ho Chi Minh City over February 2 & 3, 2015. The Forum brought together experts, dignitaries, and professionals to address the "what" and "why" of:

Getting the facts right on large hydro

by Simon Tilleard

How environmentally and socially sustainable are big dam projects? Simon Tilleard takes on the issue of large-scale hydro in his recent letter to the New Scientist.

What does “renewable power” mean to you?
Chances are, you’ll think of solar, wind and hydropower. But when it comes to large-scale hydropower, just how ‘renewable’ is this power?

I recently read an article in the New Scientist Rise of renewables starts climate-change fightback – (6 July, page 6-7) which brought home to me once again how common it is to see ‘the next generation’ of large hydropower dams held up as examples of environmentally conscious and sustainable sources of power.

In the article, authors Marshall and Aldhous indicate that large hydropower dams can help to fight back on climate change and produce ‘green power’ whilst sustainably managing environmental resources. They go on to state that a few large dams have erroneously given the sector a bad reputation and that the World Bank’s recent decision to return to funding large dams is proof of improved procedures for management.

My experience as a water resources engineer working in South East Asia brings me a different perspective. It’s abundantly clear that it’s misleading to suggest that merely a few of the older dam projects were ill-conceived and unsustainable. In reality, the negative environmental and social impacts of large dams often outweigh their economic benefits.

The 2000 independent World Commission on Dams, the most comprehensive study on dam impacts, concluded that big, complex schemes cost far more but produce less energy than expected. Examples of environmental and social impacts from large hydropower are plentiful, devastating fish losses from the Pak Mun Dam in Thailand or mass displacement caused by the Narmada Valley dams in […]

By |September 3rd, 2013|Blog, ICEM team|0 Comments