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Inception mission to Mongolia for innovative water governance project

Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia – October, 2018

Increased industrial activity and urban expansion has been putting serious pressure on Mongolia’s water sources. The Implementing innovative approaches for water governance project, funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), aims to support the government to improve the national structure and regulatory framework for water governance.

During the visit, the consulting team met with senior level representatives from the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) and national team partners at the Institute of Geology and Geo-ecology (IGG) and the Information and Research Institute of Meteorology, Hydrology and Environment (IRIMHE). The meetings were used an as opportunity to establish priorities for the project and refine the scope of the work that will take place.

The mission also included a workshop session attended by over 70 representatives from River Basin Organisations (RBOs), national agencies, and the ADB. This provided an opportunity to introduce the project and the intended outcomes and also allowed for input from stakeholders. Issues discussed ranged from a need for a stronger state database and improved data collection and entry procedures, desire for tangible project impacts and technical trainings, and interest in implementing management strategies using advanced technology.

Following the mission, the team will work closely with national representatives to develop strategies for effective river basin plan implementation, design and employ pilot projects in selected river basins, and begin work on improving the state water database. The project is scheduled for completion in June 2020.

By |October 30th, 2018|ICEM team, News, South Asia|0 Comments

Strengthening climate resilience in Bac Kan city

Bac Kan, Vietnam –  July, 2018: Strengthening climate resilience in Bac Kan city

Located in the northern mountainous area of Vietnam, Bac Kan Province is increasingly affected by extreme weather events, aggravated by the impacts of climate change. Droughts, flashfloods, and landslides frequently cause severe damage to agricultural production and livestock, harming the livelihoods of local people in the province.

To reduce the impacts of climate change and strengthen local capacity to adapt to these challenges, the local government developed a Climate Action Plan with proposed projects to safeguard critical infrastructure. To support these efforts, the Climate and Natural Disasters Resilience project in Bac Kan province was launched.

This July the project team, consisting of experts from ICEM and AREP, visited Bac Kan City to gather information of the challenges that the city is facing as well as proposed responses. First, the team met with the local People’s Committee to clarify key concerns regarding a proposed project to protect areas of the city against flooding and bank erosion of the Cau River. The proposed project includes the construction of new embankments, dredging along this area, and the construction of two weirs. ICEM would review these plans and assess their effectiveness towards achieving their intended goals.

After the meeting, the team visited sites relevant to the project such as the city’s main drainage outflow and sluice gate to the Cau River, areas where landslides occurred during previous storms, upstream drainage channels, existing embankments, and proposed embankment sites. The team took photos and notes on each of the sites to later add to their recommendations on the city’s proposal. The People’s Committee accompanied the project team to provide additional information on each of these sites.

The team will now assess erosion […]

ICEM Director General published in handbook of significant scholarly debates

ICEM Director General, Dr Jeremy Carew-Reid contributed a chapter on strategic environmental assessment of mainstream hydropower development in the Mekong to the recently published Routledge Handbook of the Environment in Southeast Asia.

ICEM’s Bioengineering, Healthy Rivers Feature in 2015 Mekong Forum on Water, Food, and Energy

Among other activities, ICEM hosted two working sessions at this year's Greater Mekong Forum on Water, Food, and Energy. Co-hosted by the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems, the Ministry of Environment of the Royal Cambodian Government, and the International Water Management Institute, the Forum is the largest event in the Mekong Region to address the confluence of water, food and energy.
By |October 28th, 2015|ICEM team, Mekong news, News|0 Comments

Construction commences on Sub-Project 4 at the Cau River, Cho Moi District, Bac Kan, Vietnam

Construction has commenced on Sub-Project 4 at the Cau River, Cho Moi District, Bac Kan with a launching ceremony attended by CPMU, DARD, PPMU Bac Kan, Thanh Mai CPC, Cung Kieu Construction Company and ICEM. The project is part of the ICEM-implemented TA 8102-VIE: Promoting climate resilient rural infrastructure in Northern Vietnam.

Biochar Project Begins with Rapid Tour of GMS Countries

Biochar Project Begins with Rapid Tour of GMS Countries ICEM's Biochar team has kicked off the project with a tour of the region's six participating countries to perform the project's rapid fire assessment of biochar potential in the GMS.

ICEM Brings Spatial Expertise to Mekong Delta Forum

ICEM Brings Spatial Expertise to Mekong Delta Forum The Mekong Delta Forum, co-hosted by MARD, MONRE, World Bank, Australian Aid, Kingdom of the Netherlands, was held in Ho Chi Minh City over February 2 & 3, 2015. The Forum brought together experts, dignitaries, and professionals to address the "what" and "why" of:

Getting the facts right on large hydro

by Simon Tilleard

How environmentally and socially sustainable are big dam projects? Simon Tilleard takes on the issue of large-scale hydro in his recent letter to the New Scientist.

What does “renewable power” mean to you?
Chances are, you’ll think of solar, wind and hydropower. But when it comes to large-scale hydropower, just how ‘renewable’ is this power?

I recently read an article in the New Scientist Rise of renewables starts climate-change fightback – (6 July, page 6-7) which brought home to me once again how common it is to see ‘the next generation’ of large hydropower dams held up as examples of environmentally conscious and sustainable sources of power.

In the article, authors Marshall and Aldhous indicate that large hydropower dams can help to fight back on climate change and produce ‘green power’ whilst sustainably managing environmental resources. They go on to state that a few large dams have erroneously given the sector a bad reputation and that the World Bank’s recent decision to return to funding large dams is proof of improved procedures for management.

My experience as a water resources engineer working in South East Asia brings me a different perspective. It’s abundantly clear that it’s misleading to suggest that merely a few of the older dam projects were ill-conceived and unsustainable. In reality, the negative environmental and social impacts of large dams often outweigh their economic benefits.

The 2000 independent World Commission on Dams, the most comprehensive study on dam impacts, concluded that big, complex schemes cost far more but produce less energy than expected. Examples of environmental and social impacts from large hydropower are plentiful, devastating fish losses from the Pak Mun Dam in Thailand or mass displacement caused by the Narmada Valley dams in […]

By |September 3rd, 2013|Blog, ICEM team|0 Comments